Aurora University

Education (EDU)

EDU-5110  Foundations for ESL and Bilingual Education  (3 semester hours)  

This course introduces effective ways to engage, support, and provide learning opportunities for English learners (ELs) based upon the theories of English as a second language and bilingual education. It reviews the historical, political, and educational issues that have contributed to public policy regarding services for ELs. It also addresses the common assumptions about how power, attitudes, and societal norms shape and affect education for ELs. Includes clinical experience.

EDU-5120  Methods and Materials for Teaching ESL  (3 semester hours)  

The course prepares participants in methodology to teach English as a second language. It focuses on approaches and techniques to teach academic content in English to English learners at different levels of English language level proficiency, and the strategies that support the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in English. Includes clinical experience.

Prerequisite(s): EDU-5110; EDU-5130; EDU-5140; EDU-5150.
EDU-5130  Cross-Cultural Studies for Teaching English Learners  (3 semester hours)  

This course focuses on how language, culture, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, gender, and perceived disability impact the teaching and learning of linguistically diverse students. It explores the negative effects of prejudice and discrimination and focuses on the application of culturally and linguistically responsive strategies to build connections between the home and school to support students' academic achievement. Includes clinical experience.

EDU-5140  Assessment of English Learners  (3 semester hours)  

This course focuses on tools and techniques used to assess the English language proficiency and academic development of English Learners (ELs) in bilingual and English-only settings. Candidates will examine the assessment issues that affect ELs and types of assessments used to identify, place and reclassify ELs. Candidates will also learn how to use content and language proficiency standards to create assessments for ELs. Through lecture and lab, candidates will gain experience in assessing primary students, grades 1-6, in various content areas and the assessments will be designed to meet the needs of each student with respect to achievement level, disability, cultural background, and primary language.

EDU-5150  Applied Linguistics for ESL/Bilingual Educators  (3 semester hours)  

The purpose of this course is to equip participants with knowledge of the systems of the English language (phonology, morphology, grammar, syntax, lexicon) and its elements in action (discourse and pragmatics). With an understanding of the way languages work, participants will apply this theory to the development of instructional plans that address real-life language acquisition problems. Includes clinical experience.

EDU-5160  Methods and Materials for Teaching in Bilingual Programs  (3 semester hours)  

This course prepares participants in methodology to teach students in bilingual programs. It incorporates a critical review of theories of language acquisition, bilingual education, and biliteracy. Participants will learn to teach in students' native language and target language, and use instructional materials that are culturally responsive, rigorous, and developmentally appropriate. Includes clinical experience.

EDU-5210  Educational Psychology: Planning, Teaching, Leaning, Managing and Assessment for Differentiated and Personalized Learning  (3 semester hours)  

This course examines planning, teaching, learning, managing and assessment for differentiated and personalized learning in grades 1-6. The course emphasis focuses on research on classroom instruction, human development, learning theory, motivation, classroom management, planning, differentiated and personalized curriculum, teaching and assessment. Candidates will investigate major theorists and theories and will explore diversity, multiculturalism and meaningful democratic learning communities, cultural, cognitive, physical, emotional, language and social development of children as related to student needs in the elementary classroom. Teacher candidates will understand and use a variety of formative and summative assessments to determine student needs, monitor student progress, measure student growth, and use the most appropriate instruments to assess students fairly. Candidates will learn how to make data-driven decisions about curricular and instructional effectiveness and to adjust instruction to meet the individual needs of each learner. Through lecture and lab, candidates will gain experience in assessing primary students, grades 1-6, in various content areas and the assessments will be designed to meet the needs of each student regardless of achievement level, disability, cultural background and primary language.

EDU-5310  Methods of Primary Reading and Language Arts for Grades K-2  (3 semester hours)  

This course includes a study of methods for teaching early literacy skills to primary grade readers, including phonemic awareness, phonics, emergent literacy, the development of the alphabetic principle, concepts about print letter-sound patterns, comprehension of connected text, vocabulary, fluency, academic language and writing. Candidates will learn classroom-based assessments to evaluate student learning in these areas, including concepts of print interviews, running records, miscue analysis, informal reading inventories, fluency checks, oral retelling rubrics and all embedded within phonemic awareness and phonics knowledge, skills and practices. Through lecture and lab, candidates gain experience in planning and teaching primary reading lessons designed to meet the needs of each learner with respect to achievement level, disability, cultural background and primary language.

EDU-5320  Methods of Content Reading and Language Arts for Grades 3-6  (3 semester hours)  

This course extends the theories and applications candidates learned in Methods of Reading and Language Arts for Primary Grades. Candidates will learn more about teaching and learning processes aligned with research-based comprehensive literacy instruction in grades 3-6 elementary classrooms with a focus on content-area reading and will continue to emphasize the methodology around the Science of Reading instruction: phonemic awareness, phonics, comprehension, fluency and academic language. In this course teacher candidates will learn appropriate and varied instructional approaches used before, during and after reading (BDA), including those that develop word knowledge, academic language, comprehension, fluency and strategy use in the content areas. Candidates will also learn about how meaning is constructed through the interaction of the reader's background knowledge and experiences. Candidates will also study the communication theory, language development and the role of language in learning. Candidates will also learn about the connection among reading, writing and oral communication. Through lecture and lab, candidates gain experience in planning and teaching intermediate (grades 3-6) reading lessons designed to meet the needs of each learner with respect to achievement level, disability, cultural background, and primary language.

EDU-5370  Adolescent Development and Learning  (4 semester hours)  

This course explores the physical, cognitive, social, emotional, ideological, sexual and gender role, racial/ethnic and vocational development of pre-adolescents and adolescents, and the relationship of adolescents' development to learning and school achievement.

EDU-5400  Methods of Mathematics for Grades 1-6  (3 semester hours)  

Candidates will develop an understanding of methodologies and approaches to teaching and integrating mathematics in grades 1-6. The purpose of this course is to explore, create and utilize a variety of instructional mathematics strategies that are developmentally appropriate and motivating for the elementary-aged student. Students will have the opportunity to participate in activities using mathematics in order to facilitate the learning, the application and the implementation of concepts and procedures to relevant and real-world conditions. Through lecture and lab, candidates gain experience in planning and teaching elementary (grades 1-6) mathematics lessons designed to meet the needs of each learner with respect to achievement level, disability, cultural background, and primary language.

EDU-5460  Methods of Science Inquiry for Grades 1- 6  (3 semester hours)  

Candidates will develop an understanding of the methodologies and approaches to teaching science in the elementary classroom, grades 1-6. The purpose of this course is to explore, create, and utilize a variety of inquiry-based instructional strategies that are developmentally appropriate and motivating for the student in grades 1-6. Mathematics and science are a systematic combination of quantitative and spatial thinking. Candidates will have the opportunity to teach inquiry activities in science in a hands-on and experiential approach. In addition, this course actively involves candidates in a variety of problem-solving, inquiry-based activities designed to develop meanings and properties of scientific concepts. Through lecture and lab, candidates gain experience in planning and teaching elementary (grades 1-6) science inquiry lessons designed to meet the needs of each learner with respect to achievement level, disability, cultural background, and primary language.

EDU-5530  Methods and Materials for Teaching ESL/Bilingual Students  (3 semester hours)  

This course provides instruction about methodology for teaching ESL/bilingual students. Candidates will learn how to teach students who are ESL/bilingual. The course will focus on language acquisition, language proficiency, strategies, ESL/bilingual education. Candidates will learn how to support students in grades 1-6 by developing listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Through lecture and lab, candidates gain experience in planning and teaching elementary (grades 1-6) ESL/bilingual lessons designed to meet the needs of each learner with respect to achievement level, disability, cultural background, and primary language. Through lecture and lab, candidates will gain experience in working with students, grades 1-6, regardless of achievement level, disability, cultural background and primary language. Includes clinical experience.

EDU-5560  Methods of Social Studies and Humanities for Grades 1-6  (3 semester hours)  

This course provides instruction about how to teach social studies and humanities in the elementary classroom, grades 1-6. Candidates will be prepared in methods and strategies for teaching history, geography, civics, government, economics of Illinois, art, drama, dance, movement, and music. Through lecture and lab, candidates gain experience in planning elementary (grades 1-6) social studies and humanities lessons designed to meet the needs of each learner with respect to achievement level, disability, cultural background, and primary language.

EDU-5570  Teaching the Exceptional Child for Grades 1-6  (3 semester hours)  

This course examines exceptionalities as identified by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The characteristics and assessment of, and methods of instruction for, students with disabilities, and the gifted within a range of cross-categorical placements is explored in depth. Teacher candidates will understand inclusion and learn how to write individualized education plans. The historical and legal evolution of special education, the rights of families, and the responsibilities of teachers will be a focal point of the course along with learning about the lived experiences of students defined as disabled within the social construction of disability. Working with and establishing partnerships with professionals and parents of children with exceptionalities will enable all teacher candidates to work intentionally, positively and collaboratively on behalf of the child. Teacher candidates will be prepared in classroom strategies for learning disabilities; attention deficit hyperactivity disorders; emotional and behavioral disorders; communication and pervasive developmental disorders; speech, hearing and vision impairment; giftedness; and at-risk behaviors. Through lecture and lab, candidates gain experience in teaching elementary (grades 1-6) lessons designed and differentiated to meet the needs of each learner with respect to achievement level, disability, cultural background and primary language.

EDU-5810-9  Selected Topics in Education  (Variable semester hours)  

This course will address a specific area of study in Education not already covered by other course offerings. Prerequisites vary by topic.

EDU-6030  The Individual, Cognition, and Learning  (3 semester hours)  

The focus of this course is the development of an understanding of the individual as learner and teacher and the implications for classroom instruction and student success.

EDU-6040  The Learning Environment  (3 semester hours)  

The focus of this course is the development of an understanding of the learner's whole environment as it affects the learning process.

EDU-6050  Technology in the School of the Future  (3 semester hours)  

This course studies the impact of technology on curriculum design, classroom practice, and the learning patterns of students with emphasis on the integration of multi-media, telecommunications, authoring systems, and interactive resources throughout the instructional program.

EDU-6060  Scholarship Applied to Teaching  (3 semester hours)  

This course serves as a review of the development of emerging best instructional practice in the American classroom. Emphasis will be given to implementation of instructional strategies resulting from educational research.

Prerequisite(s): EDU-6070.
EDU-6061  Scholarship Applied to Teaching  (2 semester hours)  

This course integrates skills, knowledge, attitudes, and habits needed to support "best practice" instruction for diverse learners. Each candidate will have conducted action research (identified in EDU 6071) allowing direct application of coursework into the classroom. Candidates will submit written projects, present results, and participate in cohort discussions reflecting on research findings.

Prerequisite(s): EDU-6071.
EDU-6070  Introduction to Action Research  (3 semester hours)  

This seminar will be used to develop and clarify topics for further investigation. It will also launch individual and/or group investigation of research questions with application to the student's classrooms through the process of action research.

EDU-6071  Introduction to Action Research  (2 semester hours)  

This course initiates a professional conversation among individual candidates, school teams, and cohorts about the major issues facing America's schools. The questions that emerge will become the focus for subsequent independent inquiry in MACI program classes. This seminar develops and clarifies topics for further investigation. It will also launch individual and/or group investigation of research questions with application to the candidate's classrooms through the process of action research.

EDU-6090  Contemporary Issues in Curriculum and Instruction  (3 semester hours)  

This course is designed to initiate a professional conversation among individual students, school teams, and cohorts about the major issues facing America's schools. The questions that emerge will become the focus for subsequent independent inquiry in master's program classes.

EDU-6110  Foundations for Esl and Bilingual Education  (3 semester hours)  

This course introduces effective ways to engage, support, and provide learning opportunities for English learners (ELs) based upon the theories of English as a second language and bilingual education. It reviews the historical, political, and educational issues that have contributed to public policy regarding services for ELs. It also addresses the common assumptions about how power, attitudes and societal norms shape and affect education for ELs. Includes clinical experience.

EDU-6115  Foundations for Language Minority Education of Diverse Learners  (3 semester hours)  

Introduces students to the theoretical, philosophical, political, social, and educational issues that have contributed to public policy regarding services for English language learners (ELLs) in the United States. A comprehensive focus will be placed in the theoretical foundations of English as a second language and effective instructional practices for English language learners in the schools.

EDU-6120  Methods and Materials for Teaching ESL  (3 semester hours)  

In this course, participants will analyze the language learning processes of bilingual students and the appropriate order for learning academic basic skills in two languages. The course will focus on approaches and techniques to teach English as a second language. Participants will learn how to teach academic subject matter in and through English. A few of the instructional methods covered include total physical response (TPR), the Natural Approach, Making Content Comprehensible through the SIOP Method, and the Cognitive Language Learning Approach (CALLA). Includes clinical experience.

Prerequisite(s): EDU-6110; EDU-6130; EDU-6140; EDU-6150.
EDU-6125  Linguistics for Teaching Diverse Populations  (3 semester hours)  

This course introduces educators to the study of the nature, structure, and acquisition of language. It examines the first and second language acquisition processes and the cultural implications of language and classroom instruction. The course focuses on the integration of theory and practice in the ELL classroom, exploring the areas of linguistics: semantics, pragmatics, syntax, phonetics, and grammar.

EDU-6130  Cross-Cultural Studies for Teaching ELLS  (3 semester hours)  

This course focuses on historical and contemporary social and cultural issues affecting selected ethnic groups. Extensive consideration and emphasis will be placed on the impact of culture, learning, and schooling on language minority children in the United States and the need of appropriate teaching and learning strategies for a diverse student population in today's classrooms. Includes clinical experience.

EDU-6140  Assessment of Bilingual Students  (3 semester hours)  

This course will provide participants with a comprehensive knowledge foundation in the selection, administration, and interpretation of measurement instruments appropriate for English Language Learners. Participants will investigate a variety of language assessment tools used to identify, place and monitor students receiving services in Bilingual and ESL Programs in Illinois. Emphasis will be placed on instruments and approaches used to determine and monitor ELL students' English proficiency and academic development in English. Includes clinical experience.

EDU-6150  Linguistics for Teaching ELLs  (3 semester hours)  

This course provides the study of linguistics applied to teaching English Language Learners. The course provides exposure to English phonology, morphology, syntax, analysis, and application of linguistic theory. Participants will also study theories and practices involving first and second language acquisition. Includes clinical experience.

EDU-6170  Methods and Materials for Teaching ELLS in Bilingual Program  (3 semester hours)  

This course prepares participants by providing them with the knowledge, skills and competencies needed to meet the needs of English Language Learners in bilingual contexts. Participants will study the theoretical basis, methods and techniques needed for effective teaching in bilingual/bicultural classrooms. Accordingly, participants will learn to develop lesson plans and materials to put bilingual theory and methods into practice. Includes clinical experience.

EDU-6180  Methods of ESL/BE Education  (3 semester hours)  

The purpose of this course is to prepare candidates in methodology to teach English as a second language and in bilingual programs. Candidates will learn to teach academic content in English to English learners (ELs) at different levels of English language proficiency and the strategies that support the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in English. Candidates will then use the knowledge of teaching methods to design and teach lessons in a sheltered English or ESL classroom. Candidates will also learn to teach in students' native language and target language, and use instructional materials that are culturally responsive, rigorous, and developmentally appropriate.

EDU-6185  Methods of Teaching Exceptional Children  (3 semester hours)  

This course examines exceptionalities as identified by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The characteristics and assessment of, and methods of instruction for, students with disabilities, and the gifted within a range of cross-categorical placements is explored in depth. Teacher candidates will understand inclusion and learn how to write individualized education plans. The historical and legal evolution of special education, the rights of families, and the responsibilities of teachers will be a focal point of the course along with learning about the lived experiences of students defined as disabled within the social construction of disability. Working with and establishing partnerships with professionals and parents of children with exceptionalities will enable all teacher candidates to work intentionally, positively and collaboratively on behalf of the child. Teacher candidates will be prepared in classroom strategies for learning disabilities; attention deficit hyperactivity disorders; emotional and behavioral disorders; communication and pervasive developmental disorders; speech, hearing and vision impairment; giftedness; and at-risk behaviors. Through lecture and lab, candidates gain experience in teaching middle and high school students (grades 6-12) lessons designed and differentiated to meet the needs of each learner with respect to achievement level, disability, cultural background and primary language.

EDU-6190  Methods of Educational Psychology  (3 semester hours)  

This course examines assessment & learning for differentiated and personalized learning in grades 6-12. This course will emphasize a research focus on classroom instruction, human development, learning theory, motivation, classroom management, planning, differentiated and personalized curriculum, teaching and assessment. Candidates will investigate major theorists and theories and will explore diversity, multiculturalism and meaningful democratic learning communities, cultural, cognitive, physical, emotional, language and social development of children as related to student needs in the elementary classroom. Teacher candidates will understand and use a variety of formative and summative assessments to determine student needs, monitor student progress, measure student growth, and use the most appropriate instruments to assess students fairly. Candidates will learn how to make data-driven decisions about curricular and instructional effectiveness and to adjust instruction to meet the individual needs of each learner. Through lecture and lab, candidates will gain experience in assessing middle grade and high school students, grades 6-12, in various content areas and the assessments will be designed to meet the needs of each student with respect to achievement level, disability, cultural background and primary language.

EDU-6195  Methods of Reading  (3 semester hours)  

This course includes a study of methods for teaching literacy skills to primary grade readers, including phonemic awareness, phonics, emergent literacy, the development of the alphabetic principle, concepts about print letter-sound patterns, comprehension connected to text, vocabulary, fluency, academic language and writing. Candidates will learn classroom-based assessments to evaluate student learning in these areas, including concept of print interviews, running records, miscue analysis, informal reading inventories, fluency checks, oral retelling rubrics, all embedded within phonemic awareness and phonics knowledge, skills, and practices. Through lecture and lab, candidates gain experience in planning and teaching primary reading lessons designed to meet the needs of each learner with respect to achievement level, disability, cultural background, and primary language.

EDU-6200  Cross Cultural Curriculum for Diversity  (3 semester hours)  

Participants will expand their awareness, knowledge, and skill in integrating cultural diversity into their curriculum. This course will increase participants' understanding about cultural diversity, enhance knowledge of specific issues in diversity, and develop skills in integrating cultural diversity into the curriculum. Participants will have opportunities to develop discipline-specific curriculum that integrates multicultural content.

EDU-6205  Methods of Content Area Literacy  (3 semester hours)  

Candidates will learn more about teaching and learning processes aligned with research-based comprehensive literacy instruction for grades 6-12 classrooms with a focus on content-area reading and writing and will emphasize the methodology around the Science of Reading instruction: phonemic awareness, phonics, comprehension, fluency, and academic language, in particular the areas of fluency, comprehension and academic language for middle and high school learners. In this course, teacher candidates will learn appropriate and varied instructional approaches used before, during and after reading (BDA), including those that develop word knowledge, academic language, comprehension, fluency, graphic organizers and strategy-use in the content areas. Candidates will learn and practice varied instructional reading approaches with a focus on shared reading, close and rigorous reading and independent reading. Candidates will also learn about how meaning is constructed through the interaction of the reader's background knowledge and experiences and candidates will also study the connection among reading, writing and oral communication. Through lecture and lab, candidates will gain experience in planning and teaching middle and high school reading lessons designed to meet the needs of each learner with respect to achievement level, disability, cultural background, and primary language.

EDU-6210  Planning and Developing Instructional Media I  (3 semester hours)  

Topics include the design and development of educational media, photography, video production, computer presentations and desktop publishing.

EDU-6215  Planning and Developing Instructional Media II  (3 semester hours)  

Expands and enhances Media I course.

Prerequisite(s): EDU-6210.
EDU-6220  Computer Applications in Education  (3 semester hours)  

Topics include integrating computer technology with common teaching/learning practices. The course reviews social, ethical and legal issues surrounding the responsible use of technology.

EDU-6221  Methods and Materials for Teaching Diverse Learners  (3 semester hours)  

Participants will analyze the language learning processes of English learners and the appropriate order for learning academic basic skills in two languages. This course will focus on approaches and techniques to teach English as a second language. Participants will learn how to teach academic subject matter in and through English.

EDU-6225  Assessment and Evaluation with Technology  (3 semester hours)  

Explores the role of technology in educational assessment, information and knowledge management, and methods for integrating technology into the assessment practice. Students will study a wide range of software packages to determine strong and weak points and write evaluation reports.

EDU-6230  Managing the Instructional Technology Program  (3 semester hours)  

Topics include configuring, managing, installing, maintaining and troubleshooting computer/technology systems.

EDU-6235  Leading Staff Development in Educational Technology  (3 semester hours)  

This course emphasizes planning and policy issues, including identification of resource needs, strategic planning, building sustainable educational technology plans, budget development, professional development programs, collaborative research, program evaluation, and change strategies.

EDU-6240  Distance Learning  (3 semester hours)  

This course addresses the use of educational telecommunications systems, teleconferencing, digitized video, and compressed video to support research and instruction across the curriculum. It includes the study of distance education and issues related to instructional delivery, connectivity, and distribution methods.

EDU-6245  Methods of Teaching and Assessing Diverse Learners in the Secondary Classroom  (3 semester hours)  

This course will focus on readings, discussions, articles, and presentation materials to emphasize the results of research on teaching, learning, motivation, and assessment in diverse secondary school settings. Methods and materials for teaching English learners will be embedded throughout coursework. Overarching themes include teacher and student expectations, the influence of culture and society on the high school student and moving from theory to practice. Candidates will learn how to develop learning environments to stimulate critical thinking and creativity to promote cooperative learning, motivation, and fair assessment practices. This course will explore the issues and pragmatic approaches to teaching, learning, motivation, and assessment for secondary education. Researchers, instructors, and students know teaching, learning, motivation, and assessment are at the heart of effective teaching and learning. Clinical experiences will provide opportunities for teacher candidates to connect teaching theory with classroom practice.

EDU-6250  Issues and Trends in Instructional Design and Technology  (3 semester hours)  

This course explores critical challenges to the school environment resulting from the increased infusion of technology. The course prepares students to make and defend policy decisions and become conversant with current trends and issues in the field.

EDU-6260  Methods of Educational Research  (1 semester hours)  

This course has the dual purpose of providing an educational research background in the education field as well as the qualitative and quantitative knowledge necessary to conduct such research. The course investigates recent developments and relevant research in education and initiates a professional conversation about the major issues in teaching in the secondary classroom. Emphasis will be placed on methods of critically reading and analyzing research reports and the development of an education research proposal. Topics include reading and evaluation of original research, issues of validity and reliability in research, and assembling research writing components.

EDU-6270  Methods of Teaching Secondary English  (3 semester hours)  

This course presents techniques that are effective in teaching in the content areas. The course includes lesson planning, classroom arrangement, curriculum design, alternative teaching strategies, and evaluation. In addition to the classroom hours, there is a simultaneous practicum.

EDU-6275  Methods of Teaching Secondary Mathematics  (3 semester hours)  

This course presents techniques that are effective in teaching in the content areas. The course includes lesson planning, classroom arrangement, curriculum design, alternative teaching strategies, and evaluation. In addition to the classroom hours, there is a simultaneous practicum.

EDU-6280  Methods of Teaching Secondary Science  (3 semester hours)  

This course presents techniques that are effective in teaching in the content areas. The course includes lesson planning, classroom arrangement, curriculum design, alternative teaching strategies and evaluation. In addition to the classroom hours, there is a simultaneous practicum.

EDU-6285  Methods of Teaching Secondary Social Studies  (3 semester hours)  

This course presents techniques that are effective in teaching in the content areas. The course includes lesson planning, classroom arrangement, curriculum design, alternative teaching strategies and evaluation. In addition to the classroom hours, there is a simultaneous practicum.

EDU-6300  Professional Research in Literacy Learning  (3 semester hours)  

In this course, the candidates will learn about designing and implementing an action research project that will be conducted during their participation in the MARI program. The topics for the research will emerge from questions generated by in-class discussions, professional language arts interests, a broad review of the research on literacy, and discussions of theories related to literacy instruction. The questions will launch individual and/or group investigation with application to the candidates' classrooms through the process of action research - a systematic process of inquiry.

EDU-6310  Effective Word Study Instruction  (3 semester hours)  

In this course, candidates learn about diagnostic and instructional approaches to teach phonemic awareness, phonics strategies, sight word strategies, semantic and syntactic context strategies, and structural analysis strategies and spelling development in grades K-12. Topics include the nature of word analysis strategies, the stages of literary development, the nature of the spelling system, assessing students' literacy development, facilitating emergent literacy, phonological awareness, and developing the concept of word and letter knowledge. This course requires a classroom-based field experience.

EDU-6320  Effective Comprehension Instruction  (3 semester hours)  

This course focuses on cognitive and metacognitive strategies to improve comprehension in grades K-12. Topics include creating an effective classroom for comprehension instruction, assessing comprehension, utilizing formal and informal assessment tools, learning strategies to teach efferent and aesthetic reading, increasing vocabulary development, and motivating reluctant readers. This course requires a field experience involving observation of a colleague.

EDU-6330  Literacy in the Content Area  (3 semester hours)  

This course is designed to provide literacy educators with strategies for the integration of language arts in the content areas. Topics include pre-reading/during-reading/post- reading strategies, study skills, vocabulary development strategies, writing to learn, and learning with textbooks/trade books/electronic texts. This course requires a field experience involving observation of a colleague.

EDU-6340  Assessment of Literacy Learning  (3 semester hours)  

In this course, candidates will learn to administer, score, and interpret informal and formal literacy assessments for students in grades K-12. The assessments will cover the areas of motivation and interest, phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, comprehension and fluency. Candidates will analyze the efficacy of current assessments typically used in districts. The results of the assessments will be summarized in a written report. This course requires a field experience with a student.

EDU-6350  Teaching Reading to Diverse Learners  (3 semester hours)  

In this course, candidates explore research-based reading strategies to develop lesson plans that meet the needs of diverse learners, including English Language Learners (ELLs), special education, slow learners, unmotivated students and gifted readers. This course requires a classroom-based field experience with a coaching component.

EDU-6370  Texts for Children  (3 semester hours)  

Course topics include qualities of outstanding children's and adolescent literature, goals of a literature program, planning the literature curriculum, multicultural literature, teaching genres, selecting literature for the classroom, criteria for evaluating and strategies for using narrative and expository text written for students in grades K-12, students' reading interests and preferences, instructional strategies for teaching literature, evaluating students' progress in responding to literature, creating a response- centered and literature-rich classroom, developing a literature-based curriculum, and current trends in children's and adolescent literature.

EDU-6380  Supervision and Administration in Literacy I  (3 semester hours)  

In this course, the candidates will examine the responsibilities of the reading specialist within the context of an individual school building. Topics include models for the delivery of reading services; legal and legislative influences on reading specialists; collaboration and consultation with teachers; providing professional development; evaluating existing reading programs and planning for change; communicating with staff, administration, and community; securing funding; and continuing personal development as a reading professional. This course requires collection and analysis of building-level reading assessment data.

EDU-6390  Supervision and Administration in Literacy II  (3 semester hours)  

In this course, the candidates will further examine the responsibilities of the reading specialist. Topics include analysis and communication of data from testing; planning professional development; becoming informed about budgeting for curriculum and reading programs; communicating with staff, administration, and public; securing funding; and continuing personal development as a reading professional. This course requires a coaching assignment (i.e., demonstration lesson/co-teaching a reading lesson).

Prerequisite(s): EDU-6380.
EDU-6400  Professional Research in Literacy Learning II  (3 semester hours)  

This course is the culmination of candidates' action research projects in which they designed and implemented curricular and/or instructional change in literacy learning in an educational setting. Topics include action planning for educational change, sharing action research, personal reflection, and post self-report on definition and philosophy of reading. This course requires a PowerPoint presentation summarizing the action research project.

Prerequisite(s): EDU-6300.
EDU-6410  Practicum in Reading  (6 semester hours)  

In this course, candidates will learn to develop and implement individual instructional plans based on results from formal and informal assessments. In addition, these plans will demonstrate candidates' knowledge of appropriate instructional materials, resources, and support for diverse populations of readers in grades K-12. This is a supervised clinical experience which requires 30 hours of work with students. The key assessment for this course involves writing two formal case studies which are shared with parents in a formal conference.

EDU-6501/SPED-6501  Assessment of Diverse Learners: Special Education and ESL  (4 semester hours)  

Participants will examine the assessment issues that affect ELLs and students with special needs. Candidates will review the types of assessments used to identify, place, and reclassify ELLs and students in special education programs. Candidates will learn to evaluate assessments as a means of generating educational recommendations for an IEP or other academic assessment measures.

EDU-6505  The Teacher Leader's Role in Professional Development  (3 semester hours)  

This course provides a foundation and applied practice in understanding and utilizing research-based concepts in professional development with school faculties. Teacher leaders will study the standards for program design, models for adult professional learning, and how to create a culture receptive to a sustained professional learning community. Candidates will demonstrate best practice in coaching and mentoring. The course curriculum is designed to increase teacher capacity and to deliver high standards in academic achievement for all PreK-12 students.

EDU-6510  Educational Leadership and Organizational Theory  (3 semester hours)  

This course studies contemporary organizational theories with recently developed leadership standards and essays on best leadership thinking to inform the candidates on best practices of the PreK-12 Principal and Assistant Principal. Instruction focuses on the examination of the evolutionary impact on human resource leadership and the concepts of changing or reinforcing a school culture and climate by using systems thinking.

EDU-6515  Technology for School Leaders  (3 semester hours)  

This course examines the role of leadership as it relates to the implementation of educational technology for effective teaching, learning, and administrative needs. Candidates will be provided theory, gain knowledge and develop skills necessary to use, evaluate, plan and implement technologies effectively within a school system.

EDU-6525  The Leader's Role in Human Resources and Supervision of Staff  (3 semester hours)  

This course is designed to provide a foundation and an applied practical approach to understanding and utilizing concepts for PreK-12 leaders in staff supervision and evaluation focused on enhancing teaching and student achievement. The course content is a blend of research-based and best practices used in supervision and evaluation.

EDU-6530  The Leadership Role in Curriculum Development, Instruction, Assessment, and Evaluation  (3 semester hours)  

This course studies the responsibilities of the PreK-12 principal as the instructional leader in the area of curriculum development, assessment, and evaluation. Topics include: collection and analysis of achievement data to drive curriculum development, revision and refinement, textbook selection, professional development, the Understanding by Design curriculum development model, curriculum mapping strategies, standards-based design, and instructional design to enhance student achievement and the candidate's knowledge and abilities in working with students throughout the learning spectrum.

EDU-6535  The Leader's Role in School-Community Relations  (3 semester hours)  

This course will emphasize the importance of community involvement and the adherence to emerging leadership standards for the PreK-12 principal and assistant principal to create a public awareness and support for school improvement. Topics include understanding the unique nature of the school's community, communication and interpersonal skills to establish successful relationships, using communication tools and strategies.

EDU-6545/SPED-6545  Collaboration, Differentiation, Instruction, and Transition for Diverse Learners  (3 semester hours)  

Remedial theories and models of intervention for the preschool to postsecondary years will be investigated, ranging from individual to small group to inclusion classroom settings. Current trends in service provision will be explored, such as response to intervention, multi-tiered support system, and PBIS models. Transition services and how they are structured based on student needs, as impacted by the qualifying disability will be an additional area of focus. Candidates will be exposed to resources to develop a professional plan and personal philosophy of working with students with ESL and/or special education needs.

EDU-6565  The Leader's Role in Fiscal Management  (3 semester hours)  

This course studies the history and current issues of school finance with emphasis on the significant role of local property tax in school funding. The role of the state and federal funding is examined, along with issues of equity and adequacy. Emphasis is given to budget construction, fiscal planning and management of capital outlay programs.

EDU-6570  School Leadership and the Law  (3 semester hours)  

This course provides candidates with a comprehensive look at the interaction between the local school and the law. The legal basis for American public education and its relationship to PreK-12 school operations will be explored. Special reference is made to current and future legal issues, which are likely to be encountered at the school level.

EDU-6575  School Leadership and the Law for Special Populations  (3 semester hours)  

This course will provide an opportunity to examine in some depth the body of law that pertains to the organization, administration, and implementation of special education programs in PreK-12 schools. The focus will be on substantive and procedural rights of special populations, students, and the authority and responsibility of states and school districts that are grounded in state and federal law.

EDU-6580  The Leader's Role in Supervision, Assessment, and Evaluation in Literacy Learning  (3 semester hours)  

This course studies the responsibilities of the PreK-12 principal as the instructional leader in the area of literacy and numeracy. Instructional strategies in literacy and numeracy in PreK-12 diverse environments to enhance student achievement and the candidate's knowledge and abilities in working with students through the learning spectrum and with all populations will be explored. This course is designed to provide literacy educators with strategies for the integration of literacy instructional strategies in the content areas.

EDU-6585  Introduction to the Internship  (3 semester hours)  

In this course, the candidate will develop a PreK-12 Internship Plan in conjunction with the faculty supervisor and principal mentor. The plan supports the candidate throughout the internship courses: EDU-6590 Internship for Educational Leaders I and EDU-6595 Internship for Education Leaders II, and the summer residency portion of EDU-6585, which occurs the summer between EDU-6585 and EDU-6590. Internship goals are outlined in each internship course.

EDU-6586  Introduction to the Teacher Leader Practicum  (3 semester hours)  

The purpose of this course is to support the candidates as they develop their practicum proposal, select a mentor, as well as review and compile research of best practice strategies to raise student achievement. Candidates will learn APA writing style as they complete Chapter One and Chapter Two of their Practicum Report. The candidates will create their Teacher Leader Practicum Plan, which is aligned with all required standards and addresses the teacher leader endorsement requirements in section 25.32 in the IL Administration Code.

EDU-6588  The Teacher Leader Practicum  (3 semester hours)  

The University Supervisor and the Administrative/Instructional Leader Mentor support the candidates throughout the internship as they implement their practicum plan. Teacher Leader Practicum Plans follow practicum guidelines, are aligned with required standards, and address the Teacher Leader Endorsement requirements in Section 25.32 of the IL Administration Code. All candidates are placed in public or non-public schools for sustained, continued, structured and supervised practicum experiences with diverse populations, which occur during their final semester in the Teacher Leader Endorsement Program for a minimum of 100 hours. Candidates are required to attend and actively participate in teacher leader seminars that are scheduled throughout the eight-week practicum.

Prerequisite(s): EDU-6586.
EDU-6590  Internship for Educational Leadership I  (3 semester hours)  

In this course, the candidate implements the PreK-12 internship plan in conjunction with the faculty supervisor and principal mentor. The internship plan supports the candidate throughout the internship courses. The faculty supervisor and principal mentor support the candidate's progression throughout the internship. The candidate completes portfolio entries, attends seminars and completes the required written reflections.

Prerequisite(s): EDU-6585.
EDU-6595  Internship for Educational Leadership II  (3 semester hours)  

In this course, the candidate implements the PreK-12 internship plan in conjunction with the faculty supervisor and principal mentor. The internship plan supports the candidate throughout the internship courses. The faculty supervisor and principal mentor support the candidate's progression throughout the internship. The faculty supervisor observes the candidate a minimum of four times per year and conducts follow-up meetings regarding the candidate's progress. The candidate completes Portfolio Entries, attends seminars, and completes the required written reflections. The candidate presents the Professional Portfolio to dignitaries from Aurora University and participating districts.

Prerequisite(s): EDU-6590 and passage of Principal Endorsement Content Area Tests.
EDU-6610  Educational Leadership  (3 semester hours)  

This course describes the role of the educational leader in the school as one who creates a vision of an educationally better culture in the school and then plans and organizes times and resources to communicate this vision to teachers, students and parents.

EDU-6630  Curriculum Development and Evaluation  (3 semester hours)  

This course will involve candidates in the consideration of multiple perspectives of the PreK-12 design, analysis, selection, implementation, evaluation, and formal reporting processes of academic curriculum development. Emphasis will be given to the backward design orientation and the three stages identified in the Understanding by Design curriculum model, curriculum development thorough mapping, standards based design, and curriculum assessment to enhance the candidate's knowledge and abilities in working with diverse populations and community expectations.

EDU-6680/SPED-6680  School Leadership and the Law for Special Populations  (3 semester hours)  

This course blends the significant legal foundations for students with disabilities and English Language Learners (ELLs) which are instrumental to the development and implementation of Special Education and ELL programs, services, policies, and practices. The legal foundations will be balanced with rich historical and philosophical perspectives. The influence of specific legislation, Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), No Child Left Behind (NCLB), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act (504), Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), 23 IL Section 226 of the Administrative Code and the Illinois School Code will be intertwined with the relevant case law. Candidates participate in a "Moot Court" simulation to demonstrate an understanding of the overall legal process impacting the decision making of the educational leader. There will be an emphasis on ethical responsibilities, the development of core values, and informed decision making related to education, students with disabilities, and English Language Learners.

EDU-6730  Student Teaching  (10 semester hours)  

Student teaching is the capstone experience of Aurora University's School of Education. It is the segment of that program when a student is responsible for directing the learning of a group of students under the competent supervision of a licensed teacher. The student is guided through experiences designed to apply the knowledge and skill gained in the classroom. In essence, the student performs the major functions of a teacher with appropriate responsibilities and supervision.

EDU-6760  Student Teaching Internship  (9 semester hours)  

Student teaching is the capstone experience of the program. The teacher candidate will teach in an elementary classroom, grades 1-6 for the sixteen-week semester; fall or spring. The candidate is responsible for planning, directing, and evaluating the learning of a group of students, grades 1-6 under the supervision of a licensed teacher and University supervisor. The teacher candidate is guided though experiences designed to apply the knowledge and skill gained throughout the program. The teacher candidate performs the major functions of a teacher with appropriate responsibilities and supervision and candidates are expected to exhibit successful teaching dispositions at all times. Program chair consent required.

Prerequisite(s): Consent of program chair, acceptance into the School of Education, passing Basic Skills, passing ILTS Content Test for Elementary Education 1-6, maintaining a 3.0 GPA, passing a CBC, EDU-5140; EDU-5210; EDU-5310; EDU-5320; EDU-5400; EDU-5460; EDU-5530; EDU-5560; EDU-5570.
EDU-6770  Student Teaching Seminar  (2 semester hours)  

This seminar meets in conjunction with student teaching and is required for all elementary education grades 1-6, candidates. During this course, candidates will be directed on how to submit their edTPA portfolio to Pearson. Successfully passing edTPA is required for PEL entitlement. Candidates are expected to exhibit successful teaching dispositions at all times. Program chair consent required.

Prerequisite(s): Consent of program chair, acceptance into the School of Education, Statement of Understanding for Initial Licensure, passing ILTS Content Test for Elementary Education 1-6, maintaining a 3.0 GPA, passing a CBC.
Corequisite(s): EDU-6760.
EDU-6780  Secondary Education Student Teaching Seminar  (1 semester hours)  

This seminar provides support to student teaching candidates in fulfilling critical requirements to gain employment in the teaching profession. The seminar also includes necessary background knowledge and professional development information on a variety of relevant topics to enhance success in the classroom and reflect learning in the interview process. In the seminar, students are expected to reflect upon the experiences of the field placement and grow in their ability to collaborate and contribute to the community of learners.

EDU-6810-9  Selected Topics in Education  (Variable semester hours)  

This course will address a specific area of study in education not already covered by other course offerings. Prerequisites vary by topic.

EDU-7010  Introduction to Educational Research  (4 semester hours)  

This course will provide an overview of educational research as a means of inquiry. Students will be introduced to the major research paradigms of quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods as they apply to various social science disciplines. Through a close examination of scholarly and empirical publications students will acquire the skills and knowledge necessary to read and discuss research literature critically. This course provides an introduction to the key components of dissertation research. Open to EdD students only.

EDU-7125  School District Policy Development and Analysis  (3 semester hours)  

This course will focus on the elements of policy development and analysis in public school districts. It will examine the purposes, methodologies, design, and strategies that comprise policy development and analysis and particularly the relationship between policy development and decision-making in education. The course will address current problems and issues in community relations as they affect administrative practices in the areas of policy development. Internal relationships such as those among various components of the school district and between the board of education and the district superintendent will also be examined. Open to EdD students only.

EDU-7133  Organizational Theory and Change Management  (4 semester hours)  

This course acquaints each student with theories and strategies of organizations that impact the leadership and organizational development of schools/universities. Students will examine the conceptual and operational steps organizations must take to manage change successfully. The course will critically analyze traditional and alternative assumptions about organizations, how they function, and why people in organizations behave as they do. The role of technology will be a primary viewpoint through the four major views of organizations. The course examines theoretical frameworks for 21st century learning organizations and the roles of technology. Open to EdD students only.

EDU-7135  Dynamics of Organizational Theory and Change  (3 semester hours)  

This course acquaints each student with theories and strategies of organizations that impact the administration and organizational development of schools. Additionally, students will examine the conceptual and operational steps organizations must take to change successfully. This course will analyze critically traditional and alternative assumptions about organizations, how they function, and why people in organizations behave as they do. Additionally, this course will examine inclusive models for community and district development and building positive relationships to support education. Open to EdD students only.

EDU-7145  Advanced School Law PK-12 for General Education and Special Populations  (3 semester hours)  

Advanced School Law students will analyze the impact of state and federal laws on PK-12 educational practice for general education, special education, and special populations. Advanced Law will also provide superintendent candidates with the conceptual and practical skills to handle the legal function of educational administration and to become proactive advocates regarding educational policy and law for all student populations. Open to EdD students only.

EDU-7155  Advanced Human Resources  (3 semester hours)  

Advanced Human Resources explores theories, best practices, and research in human resource administration. Through case studies and relevant human resources literature, students will learn about patterns and practices in educational personnel management and trends in human resources administration. Open to EdD students only.

EDU-7165  Ethical and Legal Issues of Adult Learning Contexts  (4 semester hours)  

This course provides an overview of ethical and legal issues within adult learning contexts. Students will be introduced to statutory and case law that have implications for higher education administrators and policy makers. Particular emphasis will be placed on such areas as the rights and responsibilities of students, faculty, and administrators. Contemporary ethical dilemmas will be explored such as academic freedom, shared governance, the cost of college, and access to the professoriate.

EDU-7245  Educational Technology for Effective Teaching, Learning, and Administration  (3 semester hours)  

Educational Technology for Effective Teaching, Learning, and Administration will focus on current research and administrative best practices for technology in teaching and learning and administration. The course will examine theoretical frameworks, seminal and current research, school technology policies, 21st Century Learning, instructional practices, distance learning tools, and application of standards related to technology in administration.

EDU-7265  School District Superintendent and the Educational Community  (3 semester hours)  

This course is designed for aspiring superintendents and focuses on understanding a broad range of issues that are critical to the success of a new superintendent. The major purpose is to acquaint the candidate with the human and institutional problems of managing school districts and working with a Board of Education, professional and support staff, parents, students, federal and state regulatory organizations, and the greater educational community. The role of the school district superintendent is analyzed with reference to the totality of the job responsibilities, knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to serve successfully in the position. Open to EdD students only.

EDU-7310  Proseminar in Educational Research  (4 semester hours)  

This seminar enables doctoral students to describe, analyze, and assess key questions, texts, ideas, and intellectual approaches to contemporary educational scholarship. The goal is to provide students a foundation for their own developing research projects. The course content attends to the multidisciplinary nature of educational research, how various theoretical traditions approach educational problems in complementary or contrasting ways, and how educational research functions (or fails to function) at the nexus of policy and practice. The course will also attend to the various ways empirical research brings to the foreground the role of values in educational research. Open to EdD students only.

EDU-7325  Curriculum and Assessment for K-12 Regular Education  (3 semester hours)  

This course provides district leaders with a PK-12 overview of curriculum, assessment, and school improvement. Candidates will evaluate a district comprehensive, rigorous, and coherent general instructional program. The course examines the curriculum development cycle from standards, through writing, piloting, and the development of formative and summative assessments. Candidates will focus on aligning a curriculum with other curricula and with state standards. They will also use data-driven professional development practices. Candidates will complete a project that involves evaluating a district-wide curriculum.

EDU-7335  Advanced School District Finance  (3 semester hours)  

This course will focus on the relationship between school district and community financing and the provision of educational services for all students. Current topics in financing education such as returns on investment in education, employee compensation, accountability, economics and diversity, will be examined. Students will learn how to analyze issues from a school business management perspective. The course will examine current school financing, including costs, ability to support schools, and financial implications of educational principles and values. The relationship of federal, state, and local school support will also be examined.

EDU-7345  Advanced Operations and System Management  (3 semester hours)  

This course will focus on the knowledge and skills needed to perform the functions of the superintendent of schools in school district operations including district level auxiliary services such as management of district facilities, transportation, food service, maintenance, custodial, grounds, health services, budgeting, accounting, safety, security, and all resources necessary to provide good planning and management of the educational system.

EDU-7355  Curriculum and Assessment for Special Populations  (3 semester hours)  

This course provides district leaders with a PK-12 overview of curriculum, assessment, and school improvement for Special Education, ELL, and gifted education. The course examines curriculum and assessment for special populations. Students will focus on aligning curriculum across all programs. Students will also learn data-driven professional development standards and apply them to program delivery. Students complete a program level improvement plan that involves evaluating a district-wide program.

EDU-7365  Advanced School Law and Human Resources PK-12  (4 semester hours)  

In this course students will analyze the impact of state and federal laws on PK-12 educational practice for general education, special education, special populations, and district personnel. The course explores theories, practices, and research in humans resources/talent administration. Through case studies and relevant literature, students learn current practices and trends in educational personnel management and the state and federal laws, regulations, and policies that govern educational human resource. This course will also provide superintendent candidates with the conceptual and practical skills to handle the legal function of educational administration and to become proactive advocates regarding educational policy and law for all student populations.

EDU-7410  Instructional Coaching and Adult Learning in Professions  (5 semester hours)  

This course focuses on the function of instructional coaching in P-12 settings, and provides an overview of a variety of contemporary instructional coaching models. Students will explore the fundamentals for building and sustaining trusting relationships with teachers and administrators, and providing confidential, non-evaluative, job-embedded professional development for classroom teachers. Students will explore how adult learning theories can assist in the development and sustainability of professional learning in workplace settings.

EDU-7500  Effective Principles of Mentoring and Professional Conversations  (3 semester hours)  

This course provides an overview of effective principles of mentoring, exams the role of the mentor and mentee, and explores how professional conversations are essential to the professional development of educators. Theoretical and empirical research regarding mentorship will be explored in relation to student learning outcomes. Through self-assessment, reflective practice, and professional conversation practices, students will learn how to analyze, critique, and strengthen the instructional practices and efficacy of classroom teachers.

EDU-7510  School District Superintendent and Board Policy  (4 semester hours)  

This course is designed for aspiring superintendents and focuses on understanding a broad range of issues that are critical to the success of a new superintendent. The course will include the elements of policy development and analysis in public school districts. It will examine the purposes, methodologies, design, and strategies that comprise policy development and analysis and particularly the relationship between policy development and decision-making in education. The major purpose of this course is to acquaint the candidate with the human and institutional issues of managing school districts and working with a Board of Education, professional and support staff, parents, students, federal and state regulatory policy, and the greater educational community. The role of the school district superintendent is analyzed with reference to the job responsibilities, knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to serve successfully in the position.

Additional fee required

EDU-7715  Illinois School District Superintendent Internship I  (2 semester hours)  

The year-long (365 days) Illinois School District Internship is spread across three semesters. The The Internship is a cooperative venture among school districts, the Aurora University, and the intern. All three entities have responsibilities in making this experience meaningful. The syllabus is designed to align the internship learning activities with the Programs for the Preparations of Superintendents in Illinois and the Educational Leadership Constituent Council (ELCC) Standards. Each of the internship courses requires that the intern provide evidence of a minimum of 25 hours (total for all 3 internship courses is 75 hours) of approved leadership work, aligned to Illinois State Standards at the district level.

EDU-7725  Illinois School District Superintendent Internship II  (2 semester hours)  

This is a continuation of EDU7715. Each of the internship courses requires that the intern provide evidence of a minimum of 25 hours (total for all 3 internship courses is 75 hours) of approved leadership work, aligned to Illinois State Standards at the district level. Open to EdD students only.

EDU-7735  Illinois School District Superintendent Internship III  (2 semester hours)  

This is a continuation of EDU7725. Each of the internship courses requires that the intern provide evidence of a minimum of 25 hours (total for all 3 internship courses is 75 hours) of approved leadership work, aligned to Illinois State Standards at the district level. Open to EdD students only.

EDU-7750  Educational Leadership Internship  (3 semester hours)  

The Internship in Educational Leadership provides continued practical experience in the student's major field, under close supervision and direction of local school district personnel and doctoral faculty members. The internship is defined as the process and product that result from the application in a workplace environment of the strategic, instructional, organizational, and contextual leadership program standards associated with the EdD program at Aurora University. The outcome should be a powerful synthesis of knowledge and skills useful to practicing school leaders. Each internship is unique to the needs of that particular doctoral candidate and comes at, or near, the end of the formal program of studies. It is understood that effort expending during the internship must be comparable to formal coursework. This effort translates into approximately 60-65 clock hours devoted to the internship for three semester hours of credit. Open to EdD students only.

EDU-7810-9  Selected Topics in Education  (Variable semester hours)  

This course will address a specific area of study in education not already covered by other course offerings. Prerequisites vary by topic.

EDU-8010  Introduction to Educational Research Designs  (4 semester hours)  

This course will provide an overview of educational research as a means of inquiry. Students will be introduced to the major research paradigms of quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods as they apply to various social science disciplines. Through a close examination of scholarly and empirical publications students will acquire the skills and knowledge necessary to read and discuss research literature critically. This course provides an introduction to the key components of dissertation research. Open to EdD students only.

Additional fee required

EDU-8100  Quantitative Educational Research  (4 semester hours)  

This course examines the quantitative research design and data analysis applied in education. Topics include an introduction to general linear model with emphasis on concepts and application of linear regression, multiple linear regression, two-way and three-way factorial designs, analysis of covariance, repeated-measures, and mixed-model analysis through the use of statistical software. The course provides the foundation to engage the various topics to problems in educational research.

Prerequisite(s): EDU-8010.

Additional fee required

EDU-8130  Social Foundations of Curriculum Instruction  (3 semester hours)  

This course provides an analysis of how social, cultural, and institutional forces shape P-12 educational systems, the curriculum of schools, and the individuals within it. Using the lenses of history, philosophy, anthropology, and sociology, the curriculum and the institution of school will be explored as a uniquely social experience. Topics include the changing nature of the family and its effects on schooling, the effects of ever-expanding diversity on school curriculum, processes and outcomes, and public expectations for schools. Open to EdD students only.

EDU-8150  Learning in the Digital Age  (3 semester hours)  

This course will examine the theoretical foundations and research into various techniques of learning technologies: computer-based and internet-based technologies, virtual classrooms and schools, Web 2.0, digital libraries, videoconferencing, virtual reality, networks, discussion forums, interactive whiteboards, online courses, MOOCs, etc. As well, the course will include discussions and readings about access, globalization, adult technophobia, ethics, equity, privacy, and the impact of the technologies on society in general, adult learning, and education in particular. Students will be exposed to applications for various curriculum subjects and will analyze technology standards for students, teachers and administrators (ISTE). In lab sessions, students will examine specific technologies and design learning experiences that integrate technology. Open to EdD students only.

EDU-8160  Clinical Supervision and Teacher Development  (4 semester hours)  

This course provides an opportunity to bridge the gap between theory and practice in curriculum studies through a competency-based supervised school district site experience. The focus of the site experience includes topics related to clinical supervision of curriculum, leadership of curriculum, implementation of curriculum, and teacher development. Enrollment must be preceded by discussion with the candidate's advisor and site supervisor regarding the curriculum-related project that will be completed during the site experience. This one-semester course earns three semester credit hours and is required for all doctoral students in the Leadership in Curriculum and Instruction degree program.

EDU-8163  Curriculum Internship: Clinical Supervision and Teacher Development  (2 semester hours)  

This course provides an opportunity to bridge the gap between theory and practice in curriculum studies through a competency-based supervised school district site experience. The focus of the site experience includes topics related to clinical supervision of curriculum, leadership of curriculum, implementation of curriculum, and teacher development. Enrollment must be preceded by discussion with the candidate's advisor and site supervisor regarding the curriculum-related project that will be completed during the site experience. This one-semester course earns three semester credit hours and is required for all doctoral students in the Leadership in Curriculum and Instruction degree program.

EDU-8165  International Comparative Education  (3 semester hours)  

The course examines current developments in P-20 education systems internationally and surveys a variety of global educational systems. The course provides an overview of educational reforms (in particular, neoliberal constructs) in the United States, and utilizes the U.S. system as a background for comparison. Students analyze individual national systems, regional patterns, and supranational approaches to evolving forms of schooling, as well as curricular and instructional innovations that seek to reimagine schooling in contemporary global society. Open to EdD students only.

EDU-8170  Equity, Diversity, and Justice in Education  (3 semester hours)  

This course examines contemporary issues in education, focusing on topics of diversity and justice. Major concepts such as justice, fairness, equity, and equality are explored through different theoretical lenses and brought to bear on myriad issues within the context of diverse population. In particular, Students examine these concepts and issues in relation to race/ethnicity, gender, class, culture, sexual orientation, religion, and individual/group experiences of schooling. Finally, the course exposes students to different frameworks and strategies aimed at ameliorating problems faced by disenfranchised groups, both in P-12 and adult learning environments, with an orientation toward socially just education. Open to EdD students only.

EDU-8190  Qualitative Research in Education  (4 semester hours)  

This course serves as an introduction to basic theory and history of naturalistic inquiry, including the growth of methods and frameworks for conducting research. Students will have a practical experience developing a qualitative research project. This includes skills such as development of a basic research design, research questions, interviewing, and protocols. Students also practice data analysis skills including coding, memo writing, and analysis. Throughout the semester, students learn to critically read and write about qualitative research while gaining understandings of this field of inquiry.

Prerequisite(s): EDU-8010.

Additional fee required

EDU-8220  Learning and Cognition: Current Research and Theory  (4 semester hours)  

The course examines the major psychological factors that contribute to students' ability to learn. In particular, this course provides a survey of modern cognitive psychology theories of problem solving and reasoning, memory, language, and thought. The focus of this course is on how teachers can implement psychological knowledge to enhance students' potential for academically success across content areas. The course develops doctoral student's expertise in cognition related research, as well as an opportunity to questions the implications of this research on curriculum, instruction, evaluation, and professional development. Open to EdD students only.

EDU-8225  Philosophies of Adult Learning  (3 semester hours)  

The course begins by defining common characteristics of adult learners. Readings include the research literature on learner-centered instruction. The course emphasizes theories of self-regulated learning and motivation, focusing particularly on: constructivism, social cognition, efficacy, attribution and self-determination. The course accentuates adult-oriented constructivist methods of teaching and learning, including problem-based learning. Open to EdD students only.

Additional fee required

EDU-8250  Principles and Practices of Assessment and Program Evaluation  (3 semester hours)  

This course examines instructional leadership as it affects curriculum development, implementation, evaluation, and assessment. Students examine leadership, assessment, and evaluation principles that are present in their own professional lives and that are debated and supported in the research literature. Students examine and analyze essential curricular concepts, testing/assessment programs, program evaluation models, and the impact of large-scale assessment programs with the intent to apply effective leadership content to the role of a Director of Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment in an educational setting. Students critically read, analyze, and evaluate selected curricula and curricular trends (Pk-Adult) from a number of perspectives, and develop skills to write/implement/evaluate curriculum effectively.Open to EdD students only.

EDU-8255  Program Evaluation and Data Analysis for School Improvement  (3 semester hours)  

This course will focus on theory and practice of program evaluation including research methods and design strategies to measure program outcomes and skills to evaluate curriculum and instruction. The course will include components of evaluation models and communicating evaluation findings. Students will develop general knowledge and understanding of the use of student performance outcomes and data-driven decision making in the areas of curriculum, data gathering and analysis, goal setting, conferencing, team building, and teacher coaching and mentoring.

EDU-8300  Strategic Planning: Evaluation, Assessment, Budgeting, and Reporting  (3 semester hours)  

Planning within higher education is useful, necessarily, continuous, and contains many parts. This course examines the foundations of strategic planning and the challenges faced by higher education with new management style techniques. Doctoral students explore various models of strategic planning along with the purposeful processes of assessment, evaluation, and environmental scanning. Students analyze how strategic planning initiatives affects institutional culture and climate, budgeting, reporting, and accreditation. Open to EdD students only.

EDU-8310  Adult Learning and Higher Education Internship  (4 semester hours)  

This course provides an opportunity to bridge the gap between theory and practice in adult learning and higher education through a competency-based supervised site experience. The focus of the site experience includes topics related to governance, program evaluation, management, curriculum, implementation, and faculty development. Enrollment must be preceded by discussion with the candidate's advisor and site supervisor regarding the related project that will be completed during the site experience. This one-semester course earns three semester credit hours and is required for all doctoral students in the Leadership in Adult Learning and Higher Education degree program. Open to EdD students only.

EDU-8315  Adult Learning and Higher Education Internship  (2 semester hours)  

This course provides an opportunity to bridge the gap between theory and practice in adult learning and higher education through a competency-based supervised site experience. The focus of the site experience includes topics related to governance, program evaluation, management, curriculum, implementation, and faculty development. Enrollment must be preceded by discussion with the candidate's advisor and site supervisor regarding the related project that will be completed during the site experience. This one-semester course earns three semester credit hours and is required for all doctoral students in the Leadership in Adult Learning and Higher Education degree program. Open to EdD students only.

EDU-8400  Dissertation Seminar  (3 semester hours)  

The primary goal of the course is to develop a dissertation proposal. It is intended for doctoral students who have determined their research topic. Students will cover the introduction, the literature review, their methodology, proposal writing, obtaining approval from the Internal Review Board (IRB), and proposal defense. Students will need to successfully pass this course in order to move on to independent dissertation hours.

EDU-8420  Dissertation Seminar  (4 semester hours)  

The primary goal of the course is to develop a dissertation proposal. It is intended for doctoral students who have determined their research topic. Students will cover the introduction, the literature review, their methodology, proposal writing, obtaining approval from the Internal Review Board (IRB), and proposal defense. Students will need to successfully pass this course in order to move on to independent dissertation hours.

EDU-8450  Inquiry in the Classroom: Critical and Creative Thinking in Action  (3 semester hours)  

This course will provide an in-depth exploration of both the theory and practice of critical thinking and creative thinking in a variety of educational settings. Students examine theoretical literature in the field regarding topics such as philosophical sensitivity, the development of communities of inquiry, critical thinking, and creative thinking through an exploration of ethical case studies. In particular, students are acquainted with recent educational research that reveals how philosophical inquiry in the classroom can enhance academic outcomes across content areas.

EDU-8460  Instructional Practices and Learning Theories for School Improvement  (4 semester hours)  

This course provides an in-depth exploration of advanced instructional practices as they relate to contemporary learning theories, and asks students to implement learning theories to enhance students' potential for academic success across content areas. Particular attention will be given instructional practices such as learner-centered course designs, personalized learning, critical and creative thinking, philosophical inquiry, and service-learning in K-12. Open to EdD students only.

EDU-8500  Contemporary Issues of Adult Learners  (3 semester hours)  

This course examines various contemporary issues in adult education: social justice, diversity and marginalization; human resource development; lifelong learning, globalization; the role of mass media and popular culture; technology; and health, welfare and the environment. Emphasis is on the identification definition, and study of adult learning issues and how education leaders address them. Legal and ethical issues are also considered. Participants critically analyze forces shaping adult learning and higher education to create research questions. Open to EdD students only.

EDU-8510  Social Foundations of Higher Education  (4 semester hours)  

This survey course brings various disciplinary perspectives - such as history, philosophy, political science, and sociology - to bear on the analysis of educational theories and practices in adult learning and education. Participants analyze the contributions of major scholars and leaders in the field of adult development and learning's influence on current perspectives. Additionally, participants predict the probable impact of the various disciplines on the future of adult learning and education. Open to EdD students only.

EDU-8515  Learning How to Learn: Applied Theory for Adult Learners  (3 semester hours)  

This course applies the theoretical understandings of adult learning and the skills that enable adults to learn effectively in classrooms, small groups and individually. Participants analyze and apply effective policies, methods, techniques and strategies for the instruction of adults. Open to EdD students only.

EDU-8520  Seminar in Higher Education Administration  (3 semester hours)  

This course examines administrative strategies and characteristics of adaptive and sustainable higher education organizations. Participants consider higher education administrators response to external forces (governmental agents, the public, the global community) and internal (faculty, staff, students and administrator) issues. Participants investigate shared governance, autonomy and accountability, economics, policy and politics, ethical and sociological issues, management, personnel development, program planning, and evaluation. Open to EdD students only.

EDU-8530  Historical Foundations of Higher Education  (3 semester hours)  

This course examines the historical development of American higher education from the colonial period to the present. Students will understand broadly how historic trends influence contemporary realities of higher education, the various organizational structures that exist (e.g. public, private, religious, for-profit, not-profit, and community college institutions), the various goals of higher education (e.g. training for jobs vs. education citizens for the common good), and higher education's role within our society. This course provides a critical historical analysis of institutions of higher education in relation to issues of access, retention, and student success. Open to EdD students only.

EDU-8800  Dissertation  (1-10 semester hours)  

Dissertation credits may be taken only with the consent of the dissertation chair and only after passing Comprehensive Exams. One to ten credit hours may be taken in any semester. When working on the dissertation, all doctoral students are required to remain continuously enrolled by taking at least one credit hour of EDU7800 or EDU8800 each fall, spring, and summer semester.

Grading Type: Credit/No Credit

EDU-8810-9  Selected Topics in Education  (Variable semester hours)  

This course will address a specific area of study in Education not already covered by other course offerings. Prerequisites vary by topic.