Aurora University

Education (EDU)

EDU-1810-9  Selected Topics in Education  (Variable semester hours)  

This course will address a specific area of study in education not already covered by other course offerings. Prerequisites vary by topic.

EDU-2100  Foundations of Teaching and Learning  (4 semester hours)  

The role of education in contemporary US society; the teaching profession and the standards that define it; the philosophical and historical context of contemporary education in the US; legal decisions that have shaped issues of equity in schooling; an analysis of how education policy shapes classroom practices. Includes the development of a personal philosophy of education. Serves as a foundation for all other coursework in the Aurora University education program. Note: Passing an FBI National Fingerprinting Screening that encompasses passing a criminal background/sex offender check; passing a TB test will be required within the first two weeks of the course. Students placed in private/parochial schools may be required to complete additional youth safety training.

EDU-2110  Foundations of ESL and Bilingual Education  (2 semester hours)  

The purpose of this course is to introduce effective ways to engage, support, and provide learning opportunities for English learners (ELs) based upon the theories of English as a second language and bilingual education. Candidates will explore the historical, socio-political, and legal issues related to the education of ELs in U.S., and common assumptions about how policies, power, attitudes, and societal norms shape and affect education for ELs. (Includes clinical experience). Note: Passing an FBI National Fingerprinting Screening that encompasses passing a criminal background/sex offender check; passing a TB test will be required within the first two weeks of the course

EDU-2140  Assessment of English Learners  (4 semester hours)  

This course focuses on the tools and techniques used to assess the English language proficiency and academic development of English learners (ELs) in bilingual and English-only settings. Candidates will examine the assessment issues that affect ELs and types of assessments used to identify, place, and reclassify ELs. Candidates will also learn how to use content and language proficiency standards to create assessments for ELs. (Includes clinical experience). Note: Passing an FBI National Fingerprinting Screening that encompasses passing a criminal background/sex offender check; passing a TB test will be required within the first two weeks of the course

EDU-2260  Learning Theories and Applications K-12  (4 semester hours)  

Examination of cognitive science, constructivism, social cognition, and other learning theories and their influence on how educators view teaching and learning. Students apply learning theory concepts in the development of learning activities for students. Note: Passing an FBI National Fingerprinting Screening that encompasses passing a criminal background/sex offender check; passing a TB test will be required within the first two weeks of the course. Students placed in private/parochial schools may be required to complete additional youth safety training.

EDU-2300  Technology for Teachers  (4 semester hours)  

This course enables teacher education candidates to demonstrate mastery of the knowledge and skills required to demonstrate proficiency in the current Illinois Professional Teaching Standards addressing technology. Strands will include the role and responsible use of technology in education, effective use of instructional hardware and software to differentiate and facilitate student growth and achievement, teaching with multimedia and hypermedia, use of distance learning tools including the Internet, use of technology to communicate and collaborate with colleagues and parents, conduct assessments, conduct research, as well as use of instructional technology to facilitate student learning. The course focuses on both knowledge and performance indicators, and includes hands-on technology activities. Note: Passing an FBI National Fingerprinting Screening that encompasses passing a criminal background/sex offender check; passing a TB test will be required within the first two weeks of the course.

EDU-2810-9  Selected Topics in Education  (Variable semester hours)  

This course will address a specific area of study in education not already covered by other course offerings. Prerequisites vary by topic.

EDU-3110  Foundations for Language Minority Education  (2 semester hours)  

This course focuses on the theoretical foundations of bilingual and English as a second language education. Historical trends and legal issues related to the education of language minority children in U.S. will be discussed as well as effective instructional practices for English Language Learners in our schools. (includes clinical experience).

EDU-3120  Methods and Materials for Teaching ESL  (4 semester hours)  

The purpose of this course is to prepare candidates in methodology to teach English as a second language. Candidates will learn to teach academic content in English to English learners (ELs) at different levels of English language proficiency and the strategies that support the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in English. Candidates will then use the knowledge of teaching methods to design and teach lessons in a sheltered-English or ESL classroom. (Includes clinical experience)

Prerequisite(s): Passing an FBI National Fingerprinting Screening that encompasses passing a criminal background/sex offender check and passing a TB test will be required within the first two weeks of the course.
EDU-3130  Cross-Cultural Studies for Teaching ELL's  (2 semester hours)  

This course focuses on historical and contemporary social and cultural issues affecting selected ethnic groups. Extensive consideration and emphasis will be placed on the impact of culture, learning, and schooling on language minority children in the United States and the need for appropriate teaching and learning strategies for a diverse student population in today's classrooms. Includes clinical experience.

EDU-3150  Linguistics for Teaching English Language Learners  (4 semester hours)  

This course provides an introduction to the study of linguistics applied to teaching English Language Learners. The course provides exposure to English phonology, morphology, syntax, analysis and application of linguistics theories. Participants will also study theories and practices involving first and second language acquisition. (Includes clinical experience) Note: Passing an FBI National Fingerprinting Screening that encompasses passing a criminal background/sex offender check; passing a TB test will be required within the first two weeks of the course

EDU-3170  Methods and Materials for Teaching in Bilingual Programs  (4 semester hours)  

The purpose of this course is to prepare candidates in methodology to teach students in bilingual programs. It incorporates a critical review of theories of language acquisition, bilingual education, and biliteracy. Candidates will learn to teach in students' native language and target language, and use instructional materials that are culturally responsive, rigorous, and developmentally appropriate. Candidates will then use the knowledge of teaching methods to design and teach lessons in a bilingual classroom. Includes clinical experience.

Prerequisite(s): Passing an FBI National Fingerprinting Screening that encompasses passing a criminal background/sex offender check; Passing a TB test.
EDU-3180/ENG-3180  Multicultural Literature for Children  (2 semester hours)  

Survey of children's literature and its authors and illustrators emphasizing developing children's appreciation for literature and reading on a wide range of multicultural topics. Students will be able to understand and teach a diverse body of works, authors, and movements of U.S. and world literature within the framework of various literary genres.

EDU-3185/ENG-3185  Multicultural Literature for Children and Young Adults  (4 semester hours)  

Survey of children's and young adult literature and its authors and illustrators emphasizing developing student readers' appreciation for literature and reading on a wide range of multicultural topics. Students will be able to understand and teach a diverse body of works, authors, and movements of U.S. and world literature within the framework of various literary genres. This course explores and considers the distinctive needs, interests and learning styles of elementary and middle school readers. Procedures for the evaluation, selection and integration of this literature into the curriculum are examined.

EDU-3190/ENG-3190  Multicultural Literature for Young Adults  (2 semester hours)  

This course explores and considers the distinctive needs, interests and learning styles of young adults. Procedures for the evaluation, selection and integration of young adult literature into the curriculum are examined. Students learn that the young adult novel deserves a worthy and legitimate place in the classroom.

EDU-3330  Science Inquiry Methods  (4 semester hours)  

Development and application of contemporary practices in the planning, teaching, assessment, and learning of elementary science. Emphasis is on standards and research-based teaching practices, developmental implications, instructional methods, and providing appropriate science learning experiences in the elementary grades.

Prerequisite(s): Passing an FBI National Fingerprinting Screening that encompasses passing a criminal background/sex offender check; Passing a TB Test; Successfully completing at least 24 semester hours; EDU-2100; EDU-2260; MTH-1210; NSM-2500. Students placed in private/parochial schools may be required to complete additional youth safety training.
EDU-3350  Democracy, Diversity, and Social Justice For Teachers  (4 semester hours)  

This course will prepare teacher candidates to teach social studies in the classroom while grappling with issues of diversity, democracy, oppression and cultural awareness. Along with this, teacher candidates will be exposed to social justice perspectives in order to promote equity in the classroom. A variety of teaching strategies will be discussed and professional development plans will be created in order to provide reflective learning and teaching. Digital-age media and formats will be discussed and created. Note: Passing an FBI National Fingerprinting Screening that encompasses passing a criminal background/sex offender check; passing a TB test will be required within the first two weeks of the course.

Prerequisite(s): EDU-2100; EDU-2260; Successfully completing at least 24 semester hours.
EDU-3355  Assessment  (4 semester hours)  

This course will enable teacher candidates to understand and use a variety of appropriate formative and summative assessments in order to determine student needs, monitor student progress, measure student growth and evaluate student outcomes. Course experiences will cause candidates to know how to make data-driven decisions about curricular and instructional effectiveness and to adjust practices to meet the needs of each student regardless of achievement level, disability, cultural background or primary language. Note: Passing an FBI National Fingerprinting Screening that encompasses passing a criminal background/sex offender check; passing a TB test will be required within the first two weeks of the course.

EDU-3360  Mathematics Methods  (4 semester hours)  

Development and application of contemporary practices in the planning, teaching, assessment, and learning of elementary mathematics. Emphasis is on standards and research-based teaching practices, developmental implications, instructional methods, and providing appropriate math instruction in the elementary grades.

Prerequisite(s): Passing an FBI National Fingerprinting Screening that encompasses passing a criminal background/sex offender check; Passing a TB test; EDU-2260; EDU-2100; MTH-1210; NSM-2500; Successfully completing at least 24 semester hours, Students placed in private/parochial schools may be required to complete additional youth safety training.
EDU-3365  Methods of Reading and Language Arts in Primary Grades  (4 semester hours)  

This is a basic course in methods of teaching beginning reading. The course includes a study of methods for teaching early literacy skills to primary grade readers, including emergent literacy, the development of the alphabetic principle, concepts about print letter-sound patterns, comprehension of connected text, vocabulary, fluency and writing. Teacher candidates will learn classroom-based assessments to evaluate student learning in these areas, including such things as concepts of print interviews, running records, miscue analysis, informal reading inventories, fluency checks, oral retelling rubrics and rubrics to assess strategy use. Many approaches to teaching reading are examined, including basal, literature-based, individualized, reading workshop, guided reading, and language experience. Through lecture, classroom practice and labs, the teacher candidates gain experience in planning reading lessons designed to meet the needs of young children from various cultural and experiential backgrounds. Teacher candidates will develop an understanding of the methods of teaching language arts, with an emphasis on principles, trends, methods and materials based on current research, practice and the integration of technology. Teacher candidates will learn how to develop a community of learners in a classroom where the teacher interacts with the children while applying learning theories and gaining an understanding of how children learn best.

Prerequisite(s): Passing an FBI National Fingerprinting Screening that encompasses passing a criminal background/sex offender check; Passing a TB test; EDU-2100; EDU-2260; Successfully completing at least 24 semester hours.
EDU-3380  Methods of Reading/Language Arts in Grades 3-6  (4 semester hours)  

This course extends the theories and applications students learned about in Methods of Reading and Language Arts in Primary Grades. Teacher candidates will learn about the teaching and learning processes associated with research-based comprehensive literacy instruction in grades 3-6 elementary classrooms and will continue to emphasize the methodology around the Science of Reading instruction: phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, comprehension and fluency. In this course, teacher candidates will learn appropriate and varied instructional approaches used before, during and after reading (BDA), including those that develop word knowledge, vocabulary, comprehension, fluency and strategy use in the content areas. Teacher candidates will also learn about how meaning is constructed through the interaction of the reader's background knowledge and experiences, the information presented in the text and the purpose for reading. Teacher candidates will also study the communication theory, language development and role of language in learning. In this course, students will learn how to use expository text to teach critical thinking, comprehension strategies, study skills, content reading, text structures, guided reading, reading and writing workshop, literature circles and writing strategies to 3rd- through 6th-grade readers. Teacher candidates will learn classroom-based assessments to evaluate student learning in literacy. Teacher candidates will also gain experience with understanding the writing process and the importance of content learning while modeling standard conventions of written and oral communications. Teacher candidates will also understand the relationships across reading, writing and oral communication and how to integrate these components to increase content learning. Teacher candidates will learn how to use a variety of formal and informal assessments to recognize and address the reading, writing and oral communication needs of each student. Teacher candidates will also teach elementary students to develop written text appropriate to the content areas that utilize organizational text patterns, including, and not limited to, compare/ contrast, problem solution. Teacher candidates will also teach elementary students about focus, elaboration, word choice and the relationships among the four cueing systems including phonological, syntactic, semantic and pragmatic cueing systems.

Prerequisite(s): Passing an FBI National Fingerprinting Screening that encompasses passing a criminal background/sex offender check; Passing a TB test; Successfully completing at least 24 semester hours; EDU-3365 or ECS-3420.
EDU-3420  Fine Arts Methods  (2 semester hours)  

This is a methods course in which the teacher candidates explore the educational, communicative and aesthetic value of drama, music, and visual art by promoting artistic development, appreciation, and performance through the use of various tools, including technology, for creating, analyzing and performing works of art.

Prerequisite(s): Passing a FBI National Fingerprinting Screening that encommpasses passing a criminal background/sex offender check; Passing a TB test; EDU-2100; EDU-2260; Successfully completing at least 24 semester hours.
EDU-3500  Physical Education Methods  (2 semester hours)  

Students will be introduced to theory, child development, lesson planning and technology as it applies to health and physical education.

Prerequisite(s): Passing a FBI National Fingerprinting Screening that encommpasses passing a criminal background/sex offender check; Passing a TB test; EDU-2100; EDU-2260; Successfully completing at least 24 semester hours.
EDU-3510/SPED-3510  Cross Cultural Studies for Teaching ELLs  (4 semester hours)  

(Encompasses course content of EDU-3100 and SPED-3500). This course focuses on how language, culture/ethnicity, socioeconomic level, gender, perceived disability, and cultural awareness impact the teaching and learning of diverse children. An additional focus will be on how various social institutions, particularly the school and family, may define roles and issues of diversity and disability and how this may impact collaboration and communication in regular, ESL/Bilingual, and special education. Research related to over- and under-representation, including potential bias in assessment and identification, will be studied. Finally, the teaching of appropriate strategies to support a diverse population will be addressed. Includes clinical experience in the form of a laboratory attached to the course.

Prerequisite(s): Passing an FBI National Fingerprinting Screening that emcompasses passing a criminal background/sex offender check; Passing a TB Test.
Co/prerequisite(s): SPED-2120.
EDU-3610/SPED-3610  Linguistics for Teaching English Language Learners  (4 semester hours)  

(Encompasses course content of EDU3150). This course covers the nature and functions of language: phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics as well as the analysis and application of linguistic theory. It also contrasts theories and processes related to second language acquisition with typical monolingual oral and nonverbal development of the K-21 period. This, in turn, will be distinguished from atypical development. Informal assessment, teaching techniques and accommodations, will be an additional focus. Specific focus will be given to communication intervention for some children, such as those using ESL, sign language, or alternative and augmentative communication. Includes 20 hours of clinical experience laboratory for special education majors and those who use this course for an ESL/Bilingual Endorsement, including informal assessment and exposure to software technology in common use in the schools.

Prerequisite(s): Passing an FBI National Fingerprinting Screening that encompasses passing a criminal background/sex offender check; Passing a TB Test; SPED-2120.
EDU-3620  Teaching and Assessing Diverse Learners in the Secondary Classroom  (4 semester hours)  

This course will focus on readings, discussions, articles and presentation materials to emphasize the results of research on teaching, learning, motivation and assessment in diverse secondary school settings. Methods and materials for teaching English learners will be embedded throughout coursework. Overarching themes include teacher and student expectations, the influence of culture and society on the high school student and moving from theory to practice. Candidates will learn how to develop learning environments to stimulate critical thinking and creativity to promote cooperative learning, motivation and fair assessment practices. This course will explore the issues and pragmatic approaches to teaching, learning, motivation and assessment for secondary education. Researchers, instructors and students know teaching, learning, motivation and assessment are at the heart of effective teaching and learning. Clinical experiences will provide opportunities for teacher candidates to connect teaching theory with classroom practice.

Prerequisite(s): Passing a FBI National Fingerprinting Screening that encompasses passing a criminal background/sex offender check; Passing a TB Test, Successfully completing at least 24 semester hours; EDU-2100; EDU-2260.
Co/prerequisite(s): EDU-3720.
EDU-3720  Reading Across the Curriculum  (4 semester hours)  

Students will develop an understanding of teaching reading and writing in the content areas in the secondary classroom with an emphasis on principles, trends, methods, materials, approaches and strategies. Based on theories of interactive language and writing development, the course presents methodology designed to help teachers develop literacy and comprehension abilities in the content areas.

Prerequisite(s): Passing an FBI National Fingerprinting Screening that encompasses passing a criminal background/sex offender check; Passing a TB Test; successfully completing at least 24 semester hours; EDU-2100; EDU-2260.
EDU-3810-9  Selected Topics in Education  (Variable semester hours)  

This course will address a specific area of study in education not already covered by other course offerings. Prerequisites vary by topic.

EDU-4750  Student Teaching  (13 semester hours)  

Student teaching is the capstone experience of Aurora University's School of Education. It is the segment of that program when a student is responsible for directing the learning of a group of students under the competent supervision of a certified teacher. The student is guided through experiences designed to apply the knowledge and skill gained in the classroom. In essence, the student performs the major functions of a teacher with appropriate responsibilities and supervision. For candidates who double major in elementary education and special education, student teaching is required to be 20 weeks in duration.

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the School of Education, a 3.00 or better GPA, officially reported passing score on the Illinois Content Area Test, as well as having all education coursework completed. Placement applications are due the November or January preceding the academic year of student teaching.

Additional fee required

EDU-4760  Student Teaching Seminar  (2 semester hours)  

This seminar meets in conjunction with student teaching and is required for all elementary and secondary education majors.

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the School of Education, a 3.00 or better content GPA, officially reported passing score on the Illinois Content Area Test, as well as having all education coursework completed.
Co/prerequisite(s): EDU-4750.
EDU-4810-9  Selected Topics in Education  (Variable semester hours)  

This course will address a specific area of study in education not already covered by other course offerings. Prerequisites vary by topic.