Aurora University

Sustainability (SUS)

SUS-1810-9  Selected Topics in Sustainability  (Variable semester hours)  

This course will address a specific area of study in Sustainability not already covered by other course offerings. Prerequisites vary by topic.

SUS-2150/PHL-2110  Environmental Ethics  (4 semester hours)  

This course is an introduction to environmental ethics in developed and developing countries. Lectures will emphasize current philosophical environmental ethics, understanding the values and responsibility of individuals toward the environment, and an understanding of how to balance the use of natural resources to develop ethics and obligations to deal with environmental issues. In addition, students will explore society's movements and values toward these issues.

SUS-2200  Environmental Chemistry  (4 semester hours)  

This course is intended to provide students with a basic understanding of atmospheric chemistry principles, water chemistry principles and soil chemistry principles. Specifically, this course will use a quantitative approach to examining pollutants in air, water and soils. Students will develop skills for sampling, quantitative detection and data analysis in environmental chemistry. Students will have an understanding of biogeochemical cycles and human effects to these cycles.

Prerequisite(s): CHM-1200; CHM-1200Z.

Additional fee required

SUS-2300  Natural Resources Economics  (4 semester hours)  

This course introduces the concepts and components of economics and dealing with non-recyclable, recyclable and replenishable resources. This course will discuss economic tools and techniques that can be used to make better management decisions, valuing the environment and dealing with environmental issues. Concepts of property rights, externalities, natural resource capital and markets will be discussed. This course will include case studies dealing with air pollution, water pollution, toxic substances and environmental justice in regard to risk.

Additional fee required

SUS-2400/ENG-2410  Literature and the Environment  (4 semester hours)  

This course examines the relationship between literature and the environment by addressing both stylistic and cultural concerns. In doing so, the course will examine the conventions of three major genres: poetry, fiction and non-fiction. Throughout the course, students will gain experience writing both about and in each of these literary genres in order to gain greater understanding of the relationship between literature and the environment.

Prerequisite(s): ENG-1000.

Additional fee required

SUS-2810-9  Selected Topics in Sustainability  (Variable semester hours)  

This course will address a specific area of study in Sustainability not already covered by other course offerings. Prerequisites vary by topic.

SUS-3100  Introduction to Geographic Information Systems  (4 semester hours)  

This course is only available on the George Williams College campus. This course introduces the concepts and components of a geographic information system (GIS). It also teaches the essential skills of spatial data management, analysis, and visualization through the use of GIS software. Upon completion of this course, students will understand the fundamental concepts of GIS, including spatial data models, spatial analysis and cartographic principles. Open to sustainability majors only.

Additional fee required

SUS-3200  Ecology and Conservation Biology  (4 semester hours)  

This course is only available on the George Williams College campus. This course will provide an introduction to the ecology and conservation of natural resource. Basic principles of ecology and conservation techniques will be discussed with an emphasis on humans as part of this system. The course will utilize experiential methods in examining global and local ecosystem issues and current management practices.

Prerequisite(s): BIO-1220; BIO-1220Z.

Additional fee required

SUS-3300  Environmental Statistics  (4 semester hours)  

This course is only available on the George Williams College campus. This course introduces different types of statistical analyses used in the environmental field. This course will begin with basic concepts of statistics, including formulating and testing hypothesis, random variables and inferential statistics. This course will also address more advanced topics, including sampling design, limits of detection and spatial statistics. The course focuses on applications in a variety of different environmental fields. Open to environmental studies majors only.

Additional fee required

SUS-3400  Environmental Soils and Food Production  (4 semester hours)  

This course is only available on the George Williams College campus. This course is an introduction to urban and rural soil science. Lectures will emphasize the inter-relationships of hydrology, landforms, vegetation, climate, and geologic materials with soils. The course will also focus on using soil resource information in making wise land-use decisions. In addition, the impact of humans on soils will be discussed. Students will examine organic versus conventional food production. Open to environmental studies majors only.

Additional fee required

SUS-3810-9  Selected Topics in Sustainability  (Variable semester hours)  

This course will address a specific area of study in Sustainability not already covered by other course offerings. Prerequisites vary by topic.

SUS-4100/WRI-3210  Grant Writing and Fundraising  (4 semester hours)  

This course is only available on the George Williams College campus. This course prepares students for writing grants and participating in fundraising activities. The course will utilize experiential methods and real world examples in teaching the skills necessary to maximize successful outcomes in the grant writing process. Additionally, the course will teach fundamental components of the fundraising process through a combination of experiential learning and research instruction, as students participate in activities, such as designing newsletters or organizing and presenting in public forums. Open to environmental studies or professional writing majors only.

Additional fee required

SUS-4200  Water Resources and Environment  (4 semester hours)  

This course is only available on the George Williams College campus. This course is intended to provide students with a broader understanding of water as a natural resource and its importance to our lives and the Earth's complex environment. Specifically, this course will cover physical properties of water, the hydrologic cycle, and issues related to water distribution, water usage, and water management. Students will understand the social/economical, legal, and political aspects of water resources.

Prerequisite(s): SUS-2200.

Additional fee required

SUS-4210  Terrestrial Ecosystems  (4 semester hours)  

This course is only available on the George Williams College campus. This course will introduce students to flora/fauna-soil ecosystems and focus on water, carbon and nitrogen processes. Students will learn the dynamics of change in a terrestrial ecosystem including soil pedology, and edaphology. Field sampling and research will be done in forest, prairie, wetland as well as urban ecosystems.

Prerequisite(s): SUS-2200; CHM-1320; CHM-1320Z.

Additional fee required

SUS-4300  Senior Capstone in Environmental Issues  (4 semester hours)  

This course is only available on the George Williams College campus. This course explores the interrelationships of the environment and society through the study of a complex problem that addresses issues of importance to the environment, ethics and society. Information regarding the problem will be gathered through peer-reviewed sources, reliable news sources, personal communications and field experience. The course will culminate in a major presentation, project and written piece regarding both the research and field experience.

Prerequisite(s): SUS-3100; SUS-3200; SUS-3300; SUS-3400.

Additional fee required

SUS-4400  Environmental Literacy and Critical Inquiry  (4 semester hours)  

This course is only available on the George Williams College campus. This course examines the relationship between contemporary environmental issues and effective argumentation. In doing so, the course will examine the conventions of environmental scientific, popular, philosophical and literary authors used in the presentation of various modes and contexts. Throughout the course, students will gain experience writing both about and in each of these modes in order to gain greater understanding of the relationship between rhetoric, argumentation and effective communication regarding environmental issues.

Prerequisite(s): ENG-2010.

Additional fee required

SUS-4500/ENV-4500  Environmental Solutions  (4 semester hours)  

This course is designed to provide an overview of the environmental management of natural resources by addressing issues such as technical, political, administrative and social forces influencing the quality of the environment and the use of resources. It includes coverage of government and industrial programs to combat pollution of the air, soil and water, and the legislative and regulatory regimes.

Prerequisite(s): ENV-1000; BIO-2250; PSC-3100 or SOC-3580.

Additional fee required

SUS-4600  Civilizations and Their Environment  (4 semester hours)  

This course is only available on the George Williams College campus. Through an historic and artistic lens, this course examines the interrelationship between civilizations and the environment on global, national and local levels. In doing so, the course will examine the relationship between the indigenous people and nature as well as that between developing nations and nature. In addition to this historical content, the course will look at the ways in which these relationships reflect the ideology behind contemporary man's relationship with nature. Open to environmental studies majors only.

Additional fee required

SUS-4700  Energy and Changing Technology  (4 semester hours)  

This course is only available on the George Williams College campus. This course introduces students to the latest research on evolving patterns of energy use and new energy producing and harnessing technologies. Historical examples of engineered projects, chemical processes or electronics which have changed to utilize fewer or more environmentally sustainable materials will be studied along with alternative energy, transportation planning and sustainable criteria for new construction and renovations. Social and technological changes and adaptations that human communities may have to make as the Earth's climate continues to change in the coming years will be the focus of class projects. Open to environmental studies majors only.

Additional fee required

SUS-4810-9  Selected Topics in Sustainability  (Variable semester hours)  

This course will address a specific area of study in Sustainability not already covered by other course offerings. Prerequisites vary by topic.